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Miniature Schnauzer breed profile

We don't have a breed profile for the Miniature Schnauzer just yet, but feel free to browse the pictures or leave your own.
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Comments

After keeping pedigree cats for many years and before then dogs my wife and I decided to get another dog when the last cat died in old age. We talked long and hard about what breed to have and initially we favoured a Pug. At the time I kept seeing an advertisement for a 6 month old Miniature Schnauzer which was being sold by a show kennel in Yorkshire because as it turned out he was not tall enough for the show ring , although he was was very good in all other respects. When I looked at his pedigree I noticed that his blood lines came from some ofthe most notable kennels in the States and Europe. He had apparently cost a lot of money as a pup. Dogs in show kennels are trained for the ring from an early age and Max was well behaved and showed himself off to his best advantage when my son and I first looked at him. We had travelled about 80 miles to see the dog and after a personal grilling from the lady who owned Max we paid for him and started our journey home.
The dog I suppose had spent most of his life in a kennel environment and showed a great interest in his car ride , sitting on my lap and staying awake for the two hour journey home. After being introduced to my wife he began to make himself at home and investigate his new territory. I'm not sure whether all Schnauzers are easy to train but he new the basic commands when we got him and what a pleasure it is to own any dog that does as he is told.
Life was interesting for the next three weeks , we got him a posh lead and collar had him professionally clipped after which he looked the bees knees. Everywhere where we went he was admired both for his beauty and a wonderful temprement especially with children who he adores.
After 4 weeks of owning Max my world was turned upside down when my wife was diagnosed as having cancer and needed surgery. She was away from us for 4 months and had three major operations in that time.Anyone who has had a loved one in hospital will know that especially during the night all sorts of things go through your mind and you are constantly waiting for the phone to ring and fearing bad news. During those long nights Max was a constant comfort sensing I was awake and putting his head in my hand as a sort of reassurance when I needed it. Max of course had to be left for several hours at a time when I went to visit my wife in hospital. He did not like to be left and started to howl before I got in the car. There was also limited damage to a few rugs caused by his boredom, so I would not consider a schnauzer if you have to leave him alone for long periods. We have since got another dog and he's not so bad now, but still senses when youre going out and wants to come.
Are there any downsides to the Miniature Schnauzer ? , no not many. They look good ,are highly intelligent ,easily trained , have the best temprement of any dog I've known and live easily with other dogs. The only possible drawback is the fact that to keep them looking at their best you need to have them trimmed. Max is trimmed every month and groomed every week. Professional trimming is expensive but you may be able to do it yourself.
This is a personal viewpoint of my much loved Max . He helped me through the most trobled period of my life although thankfully my wife is back home.Obviously I would recommend a Miniature Schnauzer to anyone but make sure you get one from a reputable breeder. When a breed is so popular there are some that are commercially bred and inbreeding can cause health and temprament problems. You will need to give your dog regular excercise preferably including time off the lead in a park or field. They are little athletes known for their short bursts of high speed running but will soon put on weight without regular exercise.
There you are then thats my view of the Miniature Schnauzer a dog which has given me great companionship and love. I am sure yours will too.

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