Bichon Frise breed profile

Daytona, photo by Jenna Marcum : Bichon Frise breed profile
Daytona, photo by Jenna Marcum
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Training and intelligence
The Bichon Frise is an intelligent breed, but they can be difficult to housebreak. They enjoy being praised, and becasue they are so quick and clever, are good at learning tricks.

Temperament
The Bichon Frise is a happy, cheerful, friendly breed. They love their people and being with them, and are very loving and affectionate. Owners often say these dogs are almost human!

Attitude towards strange dogs and people
They are an alert dog, so they make a good watch, but are not a guarding breed. Bichon Frises are sociable and enjoy meeting new people and dogs.

Grooming and shedding
They do not shed, but do need brushing once a week to avoid the coat tangling. A Bichon Frise should also be bathed regularly.

Exercise
The Bichon Frise is a lively dog, and will want to play with you as well as going out for regular exercise.

Need for company
Bichon Frise do enjoy time spent with their family better than being alone.

General
This dog can have a long life, so make sure you are prepared to give him the care for all of that life. The Bichon Frise coat is always white.

Find familiy friendly Bichon Frise videos at All Dog Videos.

Books


Bichon Frise: Your Happy Healthy Pet

Amazon Price $12
From $3 new.
From $1 used.

This book is almost as irresistibly appealing as BichonsIn 2004, the Bichon Frise was the 26th most popular dog in the U.S., and 9,796 were registered with the AKC. This book has everything from a list of desirable characteristics and a checklist of items new owners should have to nutrition, grooming, ....




The Bichon Frise Today

Amazon Price $29
From $14 new.
From $12 used.

The Bichon Frise is relatively new to the American dog scene, but became a solid favorite very quickly. In this all-new book the reasons for the Bichon's rapid rise to fame around the world are given along with a host of chapters on essential care for puppies and adults, effective training, breed standards, ....


Photos

Send us your Bichon Frise pictures.


Star's lazy afternoon

Star having an afternoon snooze.

Star having an afternoon snooze.

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Star conserving energy

Star likes the odd lazy day on her bed.

Star likes the odd lazy day on her bed.

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Star meeting a dog smaller than her

Star enjoyed meeting this tiny puppy.

Star enjoyed meeting this tiny puppy.

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Star has opinions at the beach

Star tells it like it is!

Star tells it like it is!

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Star's hoping!

Star knows her own mind!

Star knows her own mind!

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Star gnaws on a Stagbar

Star gets to grips with her Stagbar, a chew for dogs made from stag antlers.

Star gets to grips with her Stagbar, a chew for dogs made from stag antlers.

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Buddy, Star and a mammoth

Buddy and Star meet a mammoth!

Buddy and Star meet a mammoth!

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Star in the shade

Star appreciates some shade.

Star appreciates some shade.

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Buddy and Star paddle

Buddy and Star paddle at Dolanog.

Buddy and Star paddle at Dolanog.

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The DogCast dogs down a mine

Buddy and Star explore Snailbeach Mine.

Buddy and Star explore Snailbeach Mine.

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As a dog groomer I have had a bit of experience with bichons! I agree brushing once a week is very important, but ideally it should be everyday, especially if they are kept fairly long! Using a comb is the best tool, and if you are to bath them make sure ALL knots are out first because washing them makes them get a lot worse and tighter. It's best to dry with a hairdryer and brush at same time, rather then leave to dry by itself.
I am open to anyone disagreeing!

Our bichon frise took a little time to train to go to the bathroom outside, but now she lets us know (usually me) by softly growling at me and when I ask her to "tell me" she will bark in a high pitched way. She's a very friendly and loving dog who is playful when she wants to be, but mostly she likes when her family lays down or sits on the couch or a bed so she can snuggle right next to them and enjoy a little dog nap.
The only thing I would like to "cure" her of is her tendancy to bark at nothing at all or people walking in front of the house (she has a post on the back of the couch to the big window that overlooks the street). Usually she'll bark when someone is actually coming to the door or driven up, but mostly she barks just to bark at someone that she can't get to.
She is leash broken. She will not dare go out onto the porch unless I put on her leash or pick her up myself and take her out into the yard. However, if a dog, jogger, or someone on a motorcycle or bike come by then all bets are off.

I must say that housebreaking the Bichon can be a challenge. One day though, it seemed that the training "kicked in" and he finally understood what to do consistently. Taking a treat out to the place where you want your dog to go really helped reinforce potty training along with saying "Let's go potty outside". One side note: Bichons are so smart that they will sometimes fake going to the bathroom in high grass just for the treat!

They are cute loving dogs that love to play and be ornery!